WE’RE GIVING YOU THE CHANCE TO STRIKE GOLD. THIRTY GOLDEN PRODUCTS WILL BE PUT INTO CIRCULATION – AND IF YOU FIND ONE, YOU WILL WIN A UNIQUE, 1 OF A KIND GOLDEN GIFT.

California
The Golden State

It's not just the golden sunsets over the beautiful coast that gave California its name, but the Gold Rush in 1847 that propelled California into statehood in 1850.
The California Dream has evolved from the promise of striking gold into booming time for farmers, oilers, actors, and entrepreneurs.

THIS SUMMER

Inspired by our home, we’re giving you a piece of the Golden Coast. 

HOW IT WORKS

ORDER A CLAY POMADE, ALUMINUM FREE DEODORANT OR DAILY FACE WASH DURING AUGUST AND SEPTEMBER
IF YOU FIND A GOLDEN PRODUCT – UPLOAD TO INSTAGRAM WITH #STRIKEGOLD
WIN YOUR UNIQUE ART BY @THEAXELROD MADE WITH REAL 22 CARAT GOLD

AARON AXELROD

Fresh off the heels of ou r 55 th anniversary, the latest collaboration with Axelrod combines California’s history with LA’s contemporary art scene highlighting our home of Los Angeles as a center of art, culture and the California dream.
THE ARTIST
INFLUENCED HEAVILY BY CHILDHOOD FAIRY TALES, PSYCHEDELIA, AND THE OCCULT; FOREVER INSPIRED BY THE BEAUTY OF THE NATURAL WORLD INCLUDING ASTRO AND PARTICLE PHYSICS.
In this second collaboration with Aaron Axelrod – we wanted the gold rush to meet LA’s contemporary art scene.
THE ART
THE 3 PRODUCTS WERE CREATED IN GOLD PAINT LEVERAGING AARON’S UNIQUE TONE OF VOICE TO CREATE VERY DISTINCT AND DIFFERENT PRODUCTS. 
The idea was to create a totally different Baxter experiencewith the product and the collaborations.
THE GOLD
WE WERE LOOKING A COLLABORATION WITH BRANDS TO CREATE CUSTOM, GOLD PRIZES – BUT WE CHALLENGED AARON TO CREATE SOMETHING UNIQUE THAT MONEY COULDN’T BUY. 
With that, he created a limited run gold drip art work printed with real 22 carat gold with the gold being sourced from one of the organizations that propelled the gold rush. 

$2 BILLION OF GOLD

It’s estimated that between 1848 and 1855 more than 750,000 pounds of precious metal was extracted from California which today would have a value of over $2bn.
It began on January 24, 1848, when gold was found by James W. Marshall at Sutter’s Mill in Coloma, California. The news of gold brought approximately 300,000 people to California from the rest of the United States and abroad.

The sudden influx of gold into the money supply reinvigorated the American economy, and the sudden population increase allowed California to go rapidly to statehood, in the Compromise of 1850. 

With all its wealth, the Gold Rush had severe effects on Native Californians and accelerated the Native American population’s decline from disease, starvation and the California Genocide. The effects of the Gold Rush were substantial. Whole indigenous societies were attacked and pushed off their lands by the gold-seekers, called “forty-niners” (referring to 1849, the peak year for Gold Rush immigration). California’s name became indelibly connected with the Gold Rush, and fast success in a new world became known as the “California Dream.”

Generations of immigrants have been attracted by the California Dream. California farmers, oil drillers, movie makers, airplane builders, computer and microchip makers, and “dot-com” entrepreneurs have each had their boom times in the decades after the Gold Rush
FORT FUNSTON BEACH

Fort Funston is the southernmost beach on the Pacific Coast side of San Francisco and is part of Golden Gate National Recreation Area. 

Fort Funston is known for windy conditions and the hang-glider platform at the edge of the blue ocean.
BIG SUR

Big Sur is a rugged stretch of California’s central coast between Carmel and San Simeon. 

Bordered to the east by the Santa Lucia Mountains and the west by the Pacific Ocean, it’s traversed by narrow, 2-lane State Route 1, known for winding turns, seaside cliffs and views of the often-misty coastline. The sparsely populated region has numerous state parks for hiking, camping and beachcombing
SANTA MONICA

It is the birthplace of “beach culture,” a place where human theater unfolds daily against the backdrop of the Pacific Ocean. 

For nearly 120 years, Santa Monica Beach in Santa Monica, California, has been the dynamic link between the natural and man-made worlds, providing equal access to all who wish to congregate near this part of the coast. When racially restrictive covenants were common in the 1920s, Santa Monica was home to one of the few beaches open to all people. Oh, and it has a famous pier.
HUNTINGTON BEACH

Huntington Beach is a California city southeast of Los Angeles. 

It’s known for surf beaches, such as Huntington City Beach, with its long Huntington Beach Pier. Being the home of the Van U.S Open of Surfing – one of the largest surfing competitions globally – it also boast the International Surfing Museum with many longboards and other memorabilia.
OCEAN BEACH

Ocean Beach is a vibrant, bohemian neighborhood, with a classic SoCal beach vibe.

Surfers and sunbathers fill the namesake beach, while Ocean Beach Pier is a popular local fishing spot with sweeping views. Nearby, Newport Avenue is lined with antiques shops, beachwear and surf boutiques, organic groceries, taquerias and brewpubs.

FIND US @baxterofca